FOOD

Food, probably my favorite subject. This is a collection of some of our favorite recipes. We enjoy a wide variety of foods and hope you will find at least one of these recipes that you enjoy. Some of these recipes are original concoctions, however, others have been adapted from recipes provided by friends and family members. Check back regularly. We have lots of recipes, so rather than wait until we can type them all in, we'll start with a few and add  more as time goes on. If you have favorite recipes, send them to us and one day you might see it here too. Sorry, we do not provide monetary compensation if your recipe is used, but we will include your name if you'd like, just let us know.

I have included a little dissertation with some of the recepies, but it's my website so I 'figgered' if I wanted too, nobody could stop me. Just so you have to look closer, the recipe  usually follows the dissertation.

INDEX

Grits

Pork Chop and Rice Casserole

Split Pea Soup

Rice


Grits   (Quick or regular, not instant)

Yes, grits! Grits are made from coursely ground hulled corn. As born southerners, I was born in north Florida, not the yankee part, we grew up on grits, just as many of our 'yankee' friends grew up on cream of wheat, oatmeal or some other hot breakfast cereal. The main difference is that, in the south, we don't eat our breakfast cereal with sugar. Most of the time, we mix ours with eggs or cheese or ham gravy. Actually, grits aren't just for breakfast. In Florida, cheese grits are served with fish and seafood in many places.

I think that grits have gained an undeserved bad reputation because of the 'yankees' that come down and the only time they ever tried grits was in a restaraunt. Now, there are a lot of good restaraunts and some of them even know how to cook grits, but most don't or can't because of  'health' reasons. A person on a salt free diet will probably never like grits. To be good, salt must be cooked into the grits, not added afterwards.  You can add too much salt though. Don't do as one of my sisters did the first time she ever cooked grits.  She asked my dad, who was in another room of the house, how much salt to add to the grits and he told her "a level teaspoon". She misunderstood him to say "eleven teaspoons full".  That was a few years ago, when she was about ten or twelve years old, and she has since learned how much salt  not to put into grits.

Anyway, I think that many of you, who didn't like grits before, might change your opinion of them if you'll follow this recipe:

Grits

2 cups water

1/2 cup grits

1/2 tsp salt

butter /cheese to taste

Put water and salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil and gradually stir in grits. Reduce heat to low for at least the minimum required cooking time. My Dad always said that the longer grits cooked, the better they are, meaning 30-45 minutes. Stir often but not constantly. At end of cooking time, remove from heat and add butter or cheese (don't go over-board with the cheese, a mild cheese like velveta works best). Enjoy them by themselves or with your favorite cooked eggs.


Rice

The staple grain for many oriental and Hawaiian dishes. There are many different ideas about whether or not rice should be washed before cooking. I'm not going to make a call either way. I personally don't, but I also know many who do.

Many people like their rice to be flaky and not stick together. In Hawaii, you will find both regular rice and "sticky rice". We have chosen sort af an in-between style, the grains don't fall apart easily, but then they're not gummy either. This is what we use in all of our recipes which call for cooked rice.

Rice

3 cups water

2 cups long grain rice

1 tsp salt

Put water and salt in a medium saucepan. Bring to a full boil, stir in the rice and return to boil. Cover and reduce heat to low/simmer. Simmer without stirring or removing cover for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes before removing cover. Remove cover, fluff lightly, place in serving dish or add to other recipes as required.


Split Pea Soup

I don't really know where this recipe was taken from, but it was given to us by our daughter, Christina,. I do know that it is very good on a cool (we live in moderate coastal North Carolina) winter evening.

Split Pea Soup

1 - 16 oz package of dry Green Split Peas

1 lb (approximately) ham hock or ham bone

1 large onion, chopped

1/4 tsp pepper

1 tsp salt

6 cups water

Spread the peas out and pick out any stems or stones. Rinse the peas. Put all ingredients in a large pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cover with top slightly ajar. Simmer for 1 1/2 hours stiring occassionally. Remove the ham bones/hocks and remove meat from bones. Return meat to soup. Heat and serve.


Pork Chop and Rice Casserole

The basic recipe for this casserole comes from a very good friend, Jackie Sublette. She gave us this recipe over twenty years ago and we have evolved it into the present microwave version. The main difference between the microwave version and the oven version is the cooking time. For the microwave, cook for 15 minutes on high. For the conventional oven, cook at 350 for about 30 minutes or until thoroughly heated and bubbly.

Pork Chop and Rice Casserole

Prepare rice according to the rice recipe above while preparing the remainder of the ingredients.

6 lean pork chops

1 large onion, chopped

1 can Cream of Mushroom or Cream of Chicken Soup

1 small can mushrooms (drained)

1 or 2 chicken bouillon cubes or 1 tbsp chicken bouillon granules

Cooked Rice (see recipe above)

1 cup Milk

While rice is cooking, remove bone and trim fat from chops. Brown pork chops in a skillet over medium heat, use a small amount of cooking oil, olive oil or cooking spray if desired.  Remove from heat and let cool for a few minutes. Cut chops into cubes.

In a 2 quart baking dish, mix together all ingredients including rice. Bake until thoroughly heated and bubbly. (For the microwave, it takes about for 15 minutes on high. For the conventional oven, cook at 350 for about 30 minutes.) Cooking times vary, adjust to suit your individual ovens.